Home Special offers Newsletter About us Ships Responsible tourism Small ship cruise collection on facebook Small ship cruise collection on twitter
The Small Cruise Ship Collection

Trip Finder

Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019

Nothing says Japan more than Kimonos, tea ceremonies and perfectly manicured gardens. A country that is a combination of modern and traditional, man-made and natural, and spirit and human worlds join us to explore the southern tip of this wonderful island. Deepen your Asian experience by crossing the sea to South Korea and the Kingdom of Silla, to see the country’s largest traditional village.

01 June, 2019 to 14 June, 2019 Make a booking request for Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019, departing on 01 June, 2019

Prices quoted here are often dependent on currency fluctuations. Please check with (01432 507450 or info@small-cruise-ships.com) for the very latest price, which may well be cheaper than the one advertised here.

Adventurer Suite. From £ 5852 GBP pp
Even guests who plan to spend only sleeping hours in their stateroom will appreciate the distinctive touches of this cosy Silversea accommodation. Dimensions: 157-167 sq ft / 14-15m2 with 2 portholes. All Adventurer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two portholes (15.75'' / 40cm in diameter). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Explorer Suite. From £ 6006 GBP pp
Deck Four forward is home to eight Explorer Class staterooms. Enjoy a separate sitting area and the passing scenery through a view window. Dimensions: 175-190 sq ft / 16-18m2 with view window. All Explorer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window (31.5'' x 31.5'' / 80cm x 80cm). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
View Suite. From £ 6391 GBP pp
The perfect backdrop for breakfast in bed. As spacious as a Veranda Suite, but with a view window and Deck Three location. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with view window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed, (View Suites 310, 311, 312, 313), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Vista Suite. From £ 6622 GBP pp
A quiet sanctuary. The sitting area has plenty of room to relax. Large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views. Some Vista Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with large picture window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large picture window: 47'' x 43'' / 120cm / 110cm, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Veranda Suite. From £ 8778 GBP pp
A Silversea signature. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private French balcony. Each spectacular sunset feels like it is yours alone. Dimensions: 206-216 sq ft / 19-20m2 including French balcony (16 sq ft / 1.5m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. French balcony with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, (Suites 512 and 513 have a fixed queen bed), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Medallion Suite. From £ 10164 GBP pp
A mark of distinction. Sumptuous. Spacious. Rich textures surround you with distinguished luxury. The private veranda surrounds you with panoramic views. Dimensions: 400 sq ft / 37m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table
view cabin photo
Silver Suite. From £ 10780 GBP pp
Stylish and sophisticated. Spacious and welcoming. With separate dining and living rooms, two French balconies, and preferred midship location, Silver Suites are a favourite of returning Silversea guests. Silver Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 422 sq ft / 39m2 including 2 French balconies (30 sq ft / 3m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two French balconies with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest), Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table
view cabin photo
Grand Suite. From £ 11704 GBP pp
Expertly designed and exquisitely appointed. At 618 square feet (57 square metres), the Grand Suite is ideal for entertaining friends or enjoying quiet time alone on your private veranda. Grand Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 618 sq ft / 57m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
view cabin photo
Owner's Suite. From £ 12859 GBP pp
The name says it all. A stylish apartment. Prestigious and classic. For those whose standards are higher than most. Owner's Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 728 sq ft / 67m2 including large veranda (158 sq ft / 15m2), All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
view cabin photo

Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019 itinerary:

show reverse itinerary
Day 1 KOBE
Located on the calm waters of the Inland Sea, Kobe has served as an important port town for hundreds of years. It was one of the first harbours to accept foreign traders in 1868 when Japan was just emerging from its centuries of isolation. What followed was a surge of Western trade and exports. Today, Kobe is quite multicultural, with expatriates from 98 different nations in residence, providing a cultural diversity most easily visible in restaurants serving every kind of cuisine, including the now world famous Kobe beef.
Day 2 OKAYAMA
Okayama is an important transportation hub and one of the largest cities of the Chugoku Region. It is famous because it has one of Japan’s most significant gardens. Although the “Korakuen” Garden was severely damaged by bombs in WWII, the descriptions and paintings from the Edo period permitted an exact reconstruction. It is one of the “Three Gardens of Japan” and has been designated a “Special Scenic Location”. Known formerly as the centre of rice-distribution in the Okayama area, many old warehouses next to the preserved canal have been converted into museums, boutiques and cafes.
Day 3 TAKAMATSU
Takamatsu city is the capital of Kagawa prefecture which is Japan’s smallest prefecture. This city is a vibrant blend of natural beauty and cosmopolitan functionality with a population of 420,000 people. The port of Takamatsu used to be the main gateway to Shikoku Island until the opening of the 37km long Seto Ohashi Bridge in 1988. Takamatsu city has flourished along with the Seto Inland Sea since 17th century when Matsudaira family, the relatives of the Tokugawa Shogun, ruled this area. Matsudaira family has completed the famous Japanese “Ritsurin Garden”.
Day 4 MIYAJIMA ISLAND & HIROSHIMA
The small island of Miyajima (“The Shrine Island”) is known for the Floating Torii Gate, which is one of “The Three Most Beautiful Views” of Japan. Built in the water, the Torii Gate leads to the Itsukushima Shrine and at high tide it seems to float. The Torii Gate is one of the most photographed sites in all of Japan. There are many more shrines and paths on Miyajima that are inviting to walk. Mount Misen has a cable car leading partly up to the top with nice views and wild monkeys and deer roaming the trails. History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed.
Day 5 MOJI
Moji used to be an important international trading port with a number of well-preserved Western buildings. Several of these historic buildings can be seen along the attractive waterfront. Southwest of Moji , and part of the same city, is Kokura, the financial and business capital of the area. Kokura’s landmark is its castle, which has been beautifully restored. The remarkable garden located next to the main castle is not too far from the Manga Museum. South of Moji is the Hiraodai Limestone Plateau, Japan’s most representative karst plateau.
Day 6 MASAN
Day 7 POHANG
Pohang used to be a sleepy port on Korea’s east coast until the late 1960s. Pohang is famous for its cultural villages and the largest traditional market in the Gyeongsangbuk-do area. Nearby is the Jukdo fish market. This is the largest open-run market in the east with more than 200 fish stores –offering the best of the area’s catches. A private museum is sponsored by and features the 2010 world’s largest steel manufacturing company ranked by market value and rated number 177 on the Fortune Global 500 list of 2014.
Day 8 SAKAIMINATO
Sakaiminato is a small city almost totally surrounded by water: the Sea of Japan to the east, the Sakai Channel to the north and Lake Nakaumi to the west. Across the lake the towns of Matsue and Yasugi offer interesting experiences. Matsue is known as the “Town of Water” next to scenic Lake Shinji and Lake Nakaumi. It has one of the very few wooden castles that still remain in Japan. Touring the castle and boat rides on the Horikawa River and the castle’s moat are popular.
Day 9 MAIZURU
Maizuru port is considered as the gateway to the Japanese most popular historic city, Kyoto. Why don’t you relax on the coach to save your energy for your exciting day in Kyoto? Kyoto used to be the capital of Japan in the 8th century, and it was the centre for politics, economy and culture for more than 1,000 years. After capital functions were transferred to Tokyo in the middle of 19th century, luckily Kyoto did not lose its lustre. As soon as you step into the city, you will see how hard the local people tried to keep the atmosphere of the heyday.
Day 10 KANAZAWA
The capital of the Ishikawa Prefecture, Kanazawa once rivalled Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo) as a town rich in cultural achievements. Kanazawa escaped destruction during World War II and accordingly has been able to preserve many of the old districts in good shape. The city is famous because of Kenrokuen. Located next to Kanazawa Castle, Kenrokuen is classified as “One of the Three Gardens of Japan”. The garden has an artificial pond, and hills and houses are dotted within the 11.4 hectares. It has Japan’s oldest fountain using natural water pressure and a tea-house dating back to 1774.
Day 11 SADO ISLAND
Sado is Japan’s sixth-largest island and depends mainly on fishing and agriculture. The island’s Tori Forest Park had been selected for the successful reintroduction of Crested Ibises into Japan –a bird that was down to what was believed to be a total world population of 12 birds in 1981. At that time the last five wild ibises found in Japan were taken into captivity on Sado and both Japan and China cooperated in a breeding programme for these birds. Fortunately the work has paid off and released Crested Ibises successfully nested in the wild again in 2012.
Day 12 NOSHIRO & AOMORI
Noshiro port is bound by the Sea of Japan on the coastal plains of Akita Prefecture. The city of approximately 55,000 provides access to nearby Shirakami-Sanchi, a natural UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its wilderness of Japanese beech trees. The mouth of the Yoneshiro River is adjacent to the port and the highest point in the area is Mount Yakeyama at almost 1000 meters or just over 3000 feet. Aomori's main event is its Nebuta Matsuri Festival,held August 2 to 7. People come to see illuminated floats of gigantic samurai figures paraded through the streets at night. Aomori's festival is one of Japan's largest, and is said to celebrate the euphoria of post-battle victory, and is thus encouraged to be noisier and livelier than you may have been exposed to in other Japanese festivals. Dancers, called heneto, run alongside the floats, dancing crazily, and you're encouraged to join in.
Day 13 HAKODATE (HOKKAIDO)
Facing out on two bays, Hakodate is a 19th-century port town, with clapboard buildings on sloping streets, a dockside tourist zone, streetcars, and fresh fish on every menu. In the downtown historic quarter, a mountain rises 1,100 feet above the city on the southern point of the narrow peninsula. Russians, Americans, Chinese, and Europeans have all left their mark; this was one of the first three Japanese ports the Meiji government opened up to international trade in 1859. The main sights around the foot of Mt.
Day 14 HOKKAIDO (OTARU)
Otaru is a small harbor city west of Sapporo. Famous for its many hills and a nearby ski resort, the town has been an important trade and herring fishing center. A wide canal that led from the port to the old town’s warehouses has been maintained for touristic purposes and the old stone or brick-built warehouses have been beautifully converted to restaurants and boutiques.
Please Note:
Itineraries are subject to change.

Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019 reverse itinerary:

show main itinerary
Itineraries are subject to change.
Otaru is a small harbor city west of Sapporo. Famous for its many hills and a nearby ski resort, the town has been an important trade and herring fishing center. A wide canal that led from the port to the old town’s warehouses has been maintained for touristic purposes and the old stone or brick-built warehouses have been beautifully converted to restaurants and boutiques.
Facing out on two bays, Hakodate is a 19th-century port town, with clapboard buildings on sloping streets, a dockside tourist zone, streetcars, and fresh fish on every menu. In the downtown historic quarter, a mountain rises 1,100 feet above the city on the southern point of the narrow peninsula. Russians, Americans, Chinese, and Europeans have all left their mark; this was one of the first three Japanese ports the Meiji government opened up to international trade in 1859. The main sights around the foot of Mt.
Noshiro port is bound by the Sea of Japan on the coastal plains of Akita Prefecture. The city of approximately 55,000 provides access to nearby Shirakami-Sanchi, a natural UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its wilderness of Japanese beech trees. The mouth of the Yoneshiro River is adjacent to the port and the highest point in the area is Mount Yakeyama at almost 1000 meters or just over 3000 feet. Aomori's main event is its Nebuta Matsuri Festival,held August 2 to 7. People come to see illuminated floats of gigantic samurai figures paraded through the streets at night. Aomori's festival is one of Japan's largest, and is said to celebrate the euphoria of post-battle victory, and is thus encouraged to be noisier and livelier than you may have been exposed to in other Japanese festivals. Dancers, called heneto, run alongside the floats, dancing crazily, and you're encouraged to join in.
Sado is Japan’s sixth-largest island and depends mainly on fishing and agriculture. The island’s Tori Forest Park had been selected for the successful reintroduction of Crested Ibises into Japan –a bird that was down to what was believed to be a total world population of 12 birds in 1981. At that time the last five wild ibises found in Japan were taken into captivity on Sado and both Japan and China cooperated in a breeding programme for these birds. Fortunately the work has paid off and released Crested Ibises successfully nested in the wild again in 2012.
The capital of the Ishikawa Prefecture, Kanazawa once rivalled Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo) as a town rich in cultural achievements. Kanazawa escaped destruction during World War II and accordingly has been able to preserve many of the old districts in good shape. The city is famous because of Kenrokuen. Located next to Kanazawa Castle, Kenrokuen is classified as “One of the Three Gardens of Japan”. The garden has an artificial pond, and hills and houses are dotted within the 11.4 hectares. It has Japan’s oldest fountain using natural water pressure and a tea-house dating back to 1774.
Maizuru port is considered as the gateway to the Japanese most popular historic city, Kyoto. Why don’t you relax on the coach to save your energy for your exciting day in Kyoto? Kyoto used to be the capital of Japan in the 8th century, and it was the centre for politics, economy and culture for more than 1,000 years. After capital functions were transferred to Tokyo in the middle of 19th century, luckily Kyoto did not lose its lustre. As soon as you step into the city, you will see how hard the local people tried to keep the atmosphere of the heyday.
Sakaiminato is a small city almost totally surrounded by water: the Sea of Japan to the east, the Sakai Channel to the north and Lake Nakaumi to the west. Across the lake the towns of Matsue and Yasugi offer interesting experiences. Matsue is known as the “Town of Water” next to scenic Lake Shinji and Lake Nakaumi. It has one of the very few wooden castles that still remain in Japan. Touring the castle and boat rides on the Horikawa River and the castle’s moat are popular.
Pohang used to be a sleepy port on Korea’s east coast until the late 1960s. Pohang is famous for its cultural villages and the largest traditional market in the Gyeongsangbuk-do area. Nearby is the Jukdo fish market. This is the largest open-run market in the east with more than 200 fish stores –offering the best of the area’s catches. A private museum is sponsored by and features the 2010 world’s largest steel manufacturing company ranked by market value and rated number 177 on the Fortune Global 500 list of 2014.
Moji used to be an important international trading port with a number of well-preserved Western buildings. Several of these historic buildings can be seen along the attractive waterfront. Southwest of Moji , and part of the same city, is Kokura, the financial and business capital of the area. Kokura’s landmark is its castle, which has been beautifully restored. The remarkable garden located next to the main castle is not too far from the Manga Museum. South of Moji is the Hiraodai Limestone Plateau, Japan’s most representative karst plateau.
The small island of Miyajima (“The Shrine Island”) is known for the Floating Torii Gate, which is one of “The Three Most Beautiful Views” of Japan. Built in the water, the Torii Gate leads to the Itsukushima Shrine and at high tide it seems to float. The Torii Gate is one of the most photographed sites in all of Japan. There are many more shrines and paths on Miyajima that are inviting to walk. Mount Misen has a cable car leading partly up to the top with nice views and wild monkeys and deer roaming the trails. History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed.
Takamatsu city is the capital of Kagawa prefecture which is Japan’s smallest prefecture. This city is a vibrant blend of natural beauty and cosmopolitan functionality with a population of 420,000 people. The port of Takamatsu used to be the main gateway to Shikoku Island until the opening of the 37km long Seto Ohashi Bridge in 1988. Takamatsu city has flourished along with the Seto Inland Sea since 17th century when Matsudaira family, the relatives of the Tokugawa Shogun, ruled this area. Matsudaira family has completed the famous Japanese “Ritsurin Garden”.
Okayama is an important transportation hub and one of the largest cities of the Chugoku Region. It is famous because it has one of Japan’s most significant gardens. Although the “Korakuen” Garden was severely damaged by bombs in WWII, the descriptions and paintings from the Edo period permitted an exact reconstruction. It is one of the “Three Gardens of Japan” and has been designated a “Special Scenic Location”. Known formerly as the centre of rice-distribution in the Okayama area, many old warehouses next to the preserved canal have been converted into museums, boutiques and cafes.
Located on the calm waters of the Inland Sea, Kobe has served as an important port town for hundreds of years. It was one of the first harbours to accept foreign traders in 1868 when Japan was just emerging from its centuries of isolation. What followed was a surge of Western trade and exports. Today, Kobe is quite multicultural, with expatriates from 98 different nations in residence, providing a cultural diversity most easily visible in restaurants serving every kind of cuisine, including the now world famous Kobe beef.
* = Indicative
Map for Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019
Silver Explorer, the ship servicing Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019

Silver Explorer

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition

Length: 108 metres

Passenger Capacity: 132

Built / refurbished: 1989 / 2008

The purpose-built Silver Explorer expedition ship (formerly the Prince Albert II) has been designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations, including both of earth’s polar regions. A strengthened hull with a Lloyd’s Register ice-class notation (1A) for passenger vessels enables Silver Explorer to safely push through ice floes with ease.

A fleet of Zodiac boats allows guests to visit even the most off-the-beaten path locations and an expert Expedition Team provides insight and understanding to each unforgettable Silver Explorer cruise adventure.

Cabin layout for Silver Explorer
• Discover Okayama, Takamatsu, Miyajima and Hiroshima, Sakaiminato, Maizuru (Gateway to Kyoto), Kanazawa

• See Korea’s traditional lifestyle attending a tea ceremony and during a visit of Gyeongju Yangdong Village, Korea’s largest traditional village

• Stand at Hiroshima Ground Zero and experience the sombre history of this crucial World War II site

• Try some of Japan’s special dishes and ice-creams and master the craft of udon noodle making

• See several UNESCO World Heritage Sites

• Stroll through some of Japan’s most famous gardens to enjoy and understand the aesthetic and poetic concepts of the Japanese art of gardening
Enquire now about Kobe to Hokkaido: Japan Expedition Cruise 2019

Travel on the Silver Explorer

You may be interested in...


Cairns to Apra: South Pacific Islands Expedition Cruise
Join us to experience the highlights of Melanesia and Micronesia; the true gems of the regions. Starting in Cairns, Silver Explorer will sail through Papua New Guinea and will finally ......click here to read more.

Sailing the Inside Passage
Join us to sail the Inside Passage from Vancouver, British Columbia to Seward, Alaska and experience the dynamic culture and natural splendour this region has to offer. Retrace parts of ......click here to read more.

Melanesia: From Blue Lagoons to Active Volcanoes
From underwater wonders to blue lagoons to active volcanos, Melanesia is an island paradise forgotten by most of the world's travellers. Stunning, fascinating an above all authentic, you cannot help ......click here to read more.