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Falkland Islands

The Falkland Islands cruise delivers you to the secret wildlife treasures of the Southern Hemisphere. Combining Argentinian and European cultures, the Falklands are home for multiple species of birds including Magellanic, Gentoo, and Rockhopper penguins.

01 November, 2019 to 10 November, 2019 Make a booking request for Falkland Islands, departing on 01 November, 2019

Prices quoted here are often dependent on currency fluctuations. Please check with (01432 507450 or info@small-cruise-ships.com) for the very latest price, which may well be cheaper than the one advertised here.

Quadruple Porthole £ 4815 GBP pp
The cabin provides you with; 1 porthole, 2 upper & lower berths, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a hair dryer
view cabin photo
Triple Porthole £ 5445 GBP pp
Same as the Quadruple Porthole, but with 3 berths. The cabin provides you with; 1 porthole, 1 upper berth & 2 lower berths, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a hair dryer and ample storage space. This cabin is suitable for families traveling with children, or passengers who do not require a twin or more luxurious cabin.
view cabin photo
Twin Porthole £ 5945 GBP pp
The cabin provides you with; 1 porthole, 2 lower berths, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a hair dryer and ample storage space.
view cabin photo
Twin Window £ 6165 GBP pp
The cabin provides you with; 1 window, 2 lower berths, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a hair dryer and ample storage space.
view cabin photo
Twin Deluxe £ 6615 GBP pp
The cabin provides you with; 2 windows, 2 lower berths, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a hair dryer and ample storage space. These cabins are corner cabins and are slightly more spacious than the normal twin cabins window / porthole cabins.
view cabin photo
Superior £ 7115 GBP pp
The cabin provides you with; 2 windows, 1 double bed, 1 sofa bed, Private shower & toilet, Desk & chair, Flatscreen TV, Telephone and Internet connection, a refrigerator, a hair dryer and ample storage space.
view cabin photo

Falkland Islands itinerary:

show reverse itinerary
Day 1: Sandy Argentine Beaches
You embark from Puerto Madryn in the afternoon, your prow aimed for the Falkland Islands. Golfo Nuevo is renowned for its visiting southern right whales, so you have a good chance of spotting one as you sail toward the open ocean.
Days 2 - 3: Sea Life, Sea Birds
Though you’re now at sea, there’s rarely a lonesome moment here: Several species of bird follow the vessel southeast, such as albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters, and diving petrels.
Days 4 - 8: Finding the Falklands
The Falkland (Malvinas) Islands offer an abundance of wildlife that is easily approachable, though caution is always advised. These islands are largely unknown gems, the site of a 1982 war between the UK and Argentina. Not only do various species of bird live here, but chances are great you’ll see both Peale’s dolphins and Commerson’s dolphins in the surrounding waters. During this segment of the voyage, you may visit the following sites: Steeple Jason – Home to the world’s largest black-browed albatross colony (roughly 113,000), Steeple Jason is a wild and rarely visited island buffeted by wind and waves. Weather and swell conditions dictate the journey here. Carcass Island – Despite its name, this island is pleasantly rodent-free and hence bounteous with birdlife. Anything from breeding Magellanic penguins and gentoos to numerous waders and passerine birds (including Cobb’s wrens and tussock-birds) live here. Saunders Island – On Saunders Island you can see the black-browed albatross and its sometimes-clumsy landings, along with breeding imperial shags and rockhopper penguins. King penguins, Magellanic penguins, and gentoos are also found here. West Point Island – This location is home to black-browed albatrosses and rockhopper penguins. Grave Cove – Nesting gentoo penguins and excellent hiking opportunities abound here. Volunteer Point – A large white-sand beach, Volunteer Point is somewhat exposed but has a large king penguin rookery as well as other birdlife. Port Stanley – The capital of the Falklands and the seat of its culture, Port Stanley has some Victorian-era charm: colorful houses, well-tended gardens, and English-style pubs are all to be found here. You can also see several century-old clipper ships nearby, silent witnesses to the hardships of 19th century sailors. The small but interesting museum is also worth a visit, covering the early days of settlement up to the Falklands War. Approximately 2,100 people live in Port Stanley. Feel free to wander at will, though be aware that admission fees to local attractions are not included in the voyage. Sandy Bay – The nearby Big Pond offers excellent wildlife opportunities, featuring dark-faced ground-tyrants and Magellanic snipes. There’s also an easy walk to see gentoo penguins, Magellanic penguins, rockhoppers, and king cormorants. Sea Lion Island – This is a very exposed location, so you may need some luck to stop here. If a landing is possible, it’s well worth the trip: The island is home to the largest breeding colony of southern elephant seals in the archipelago, with approximately 2,000 individuals on the northern beaches. A moderate walk will also take you to a southern sea lion haul-out. Coffin’s Harbour – This area is a relatively short walk from the landing site at the New Island South Wildlife Reserve, providing views of nesting black-browed albatrosses and rockhopper penguins. A more strenuous hike to Landsend Bluff may also show you some South American fur seals. The site of the only land-based whaling station on the Falkland Islands is south of this landing beach. New Island North – Landing at this nature reserve requires a special permit. If received, you can make a farewell visit to the black-browed albatrosses (among other birds) and South American fur seals that call the Falklands home.
Day 9: Sailing toward the sunset
As you sail westward, seabirds trail you all the way to South America.
Day 10: Earth’s southernmost city
You arrive and disembark in Ushuaia, commonly held to be the world’s most southern city. It is located on the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, nicknamed the “End of the World.” But despite this stopping point, the wealth of memories you’ve made on your Antarctic expedition will travel with you wherever your next adventure lies.
Please Note:
All itineraries are for guidance only. Programs may vary depending on local ice, weather, and wildlife conditions. The on-board expedition leader will determine the final itinerary. Flexibility is paramount for expedition cruises. Average cruising speed of m/v Plancius is 10.5 knots.

Falkland Islands reverse itinerary:

show main itinerary
All itineraries are for guidance only. Programs may vary depending on local ice, weather, and wildlife conditions. The on-board expedition leader will determine the final itinerary. Flexibility is paramount for expedition cruises. Average cruising speed of m/v Plancius is 10.5 knots.
You arrive and disembark in Ushuaia, commonly held to be the world’s most southern city. It is located on the Tierra del Fuego archipelago, nicknamed the “End of the World.” But despite this stopping point, the wealth of memories you’ve made on your Antarctic expedition will travel with you wherever your next adventure lies.
As you sail westward, seabirds trail you all the way to South America.
The Falkland (Malvinas) Islands offer an abundance of wildlife that is easily approachable, though caution is always advised. These islands are largely unknown gems, the site of a 1982 war between the UK and Argentina. Not only do various species of bird live here, but chances are great you’ll see both Peale’s dolphins and Commerson’s dolphins in the surrounding waters. During this segment of the voyage, you may visit the following sites: Steeple Jason – Home to the world’s largest black-browed albatross colony (roughly 113,000), Steeple Jason is a wild and rarely visited island buffeted by wind and waves. Weather and swell conditions dictate the journey here. Carcass Island – Despite its name, this island is pleasantly rodent-free and hence bounteous with birdlife. Anything from breeding Magellanic penguins and gentoos to numerous waders and passerine birds (including Cobb’s wrens and tussock-birds) live here. Saunders Island – On Saunders Island you can see the black-browed albatross and its sometimes-clumsy landings, along with breeding imperial shags and rockhopper penguins. King penguins, Magellanic penguins, and gentoos are also found here. West Point Island – This location is home to black-browed albatrosses and rockhopper penguins. Grave Cove – Nesting gentoo penguins and excellent hiking opportunities abound here. Volunteer Point – A large white-sand beach, Volunteer Point is somewhat exposed but has a large king penguin rookery as well as other birdlife. Port Stanley – The capital of the Falklands and the seat of its culture, Port Stanley has some Victorian-era charm: colorful houses, well-tended gardens, and English-style pubs are all to be found here. You can also see several century-old clipper ships nearby, silent witnesses to the hardships of 19th century sailors. The small but interesting museum is also worth a visit, covering the early days of settlement up to the Falklands War. Approximately 2,100 people live in Port Stanley. Feel free to wander at will, though be aware that admission fees to local attractions are not included in the voyage. Sandy Bay – The nearby Big Pond offers excellent wildlife opportunities, featuring dark-faced ground-tyrants and Magellanic snipes. There’s also an easy walk to see gentoo penguins, Magellanic penguins, rockhoppers, and king cormorants. Sea Lion Island – This is a very exposed location, so you may need some luck to stop here. If a landing is possible, it’s well worth the trip: The island is home to the largest breeding colony of southern elephant seals in the archipelago, with approximately 2,000 individuals on the northern beaches. A moderate walk will also take you to a southern sea lion haul-out. Coffin’s Harbour – This area is a relatively short walk from the landing site at the New Island South Wildlife Reserve, providing views of nesting black-browed albatrosses and rockhopper penguins. A more strenuous hike to Landsend Bluff may also show you some South American fur seals. The site of the only land-based whaling station on the Falkland Islands is south of this landing beach. New Island North – Landing at this nature reserve requires a special permit. If received, you can make a farewell visit to the black-browed albatrosses (among other birds) and South American fur seals that call the Falklands home.
Though you’re now at sea, there’s rarely a lonesome moment here: Several species of bird follow the vessel southeast, such as albatrosses, storm petrels, shearwaters, and diving petrels.
You embark from Puerto Madryn in the afternoon, your prow aimed for the Falkland Islands. Golfo Nuevo is renowned for its visiting southern right whales, so you have a good chance of spotting one as you sail toward the open ocean.
* = Indicative
Map for Falkland Islands
Plancius, the ship servicing Falkland Islands

Plancius

Vessel Type:  Expedition

Length: 89 metres

Passenger Capacity: 114

Built / refurbished: 1976 /2009

M/V "Plancius" was built in 1976 as an oceanographic research vessel for the Royal Dutch Navy and was named "Hr. Ms. Tydeman". The ship sailed for the Dutch Navy until June 2004 when she was converted into an expedition cruise ship..

The vessel was completely rebuilt as a 114-passenger vessel in 2009 and complies with the latest SOLAS-regulations (Safety Of Life At Sea). M/v "Plancius" is classed by Lloyd's Register in London and flies the Dutch flag.

M/v "Plancius" accommodates 114 passengers in 53 passenger cabins with private toilet and shower in 4 quadruple private cabins, 39 twin private cabins (ca. 15 square meters) and 10 twin superior cabins (ca. 21 square meters).

All cabins offer lower berths (either two single beds or one queen-size bed), except for the 4 quadruple cabins (for 4 persons in 2x upper and lower beds).

The vessel offers a restaurant/lecture room on deck 3 and a spacious observation lounge (with bar) on deck 5 with large windows, offering full panorama view. M/v "Plancius" has large open deck spaces (with full walk-around possibilities on deck 3), giving excellent opportunities to enjoy the scenery and wildlife. She is furthermore equipped with 10 Mark V zodiacs, including 40 HP 4-stroke outboard engines and 2 gangways on the starboard side, guaranteeing a swift zodiac operation.

M/v "Plancius" is comfortable and nicely decorated, but is not a luxury vessel. Our voyages in the Arctic and Antarctic regions are and will still be primarily defined by an exploratory educational travel programme, spending as much time ashore as possible. This vessel will fully meet our demands to achieve this.

The vessel is equipped with a diesel-electric propulsion system which reduces the noise and vibration of the engines considerably. The 3 diesel engines generate 1.230 horse-power each, giving the vessel a speed of 10 - 12 knots. The vessel is ice-strengthened and was specially built for oceanographic voyages.

M/v "Plancius" is manned by 17 nautical crew, 19 hotel staff (6 chefs, 1 hotel manager, 1 steward-barman and 11 stewards / cabin cleaners), 8 expedition staff (1 expedition leader and 7 guides-lecturers) and 1 doctor.

Ice class: Plancius was built for Ice conditions. To reach these ice-conditions she has a strengthened bow and stern. The hull is thicker and the whole construction on the waterline of the vessel is reinforced by using extra frames. Where the normal frame spacing is 65cm, we have on the bow-line and stern also frames in between so there the frame spacing is approx 30cm. Because Plancius was built to do surveys she has a special six blade bronze propeller, the shape of the propeller makes Plancius a very silent ship. Plancius has a Lloyds class notation 100A1 Passenger ship, Ice Class 1D at a draught of 5 meters (which is our waterline).


Cabin layout for Plancius
• See Black-browed Albatross. So efficient in the air that their in-flight heart rate barely rises above resting, these sub-Antarctic birds pack a stomach full of oil they can spit at would-be attackers

• Visit Carcass Island. The north-west of the archipelago, is owned by Rob and Lorraine McGill. The traditional island high-tea with home-backed cakes and cookies should not be missed. Carcass Island is rodent free and hence has a bounty of birdlife from breeding Magellanic and Gentoo penguins, to numerous waders and passerine birds including several endemics to the islands such as the Cobb’s wren and the Tussack bird

• Explore Grave Cove. A small cove situated within Hope Harbour on the mainland of West Falkland, Grave Cove belongs to Hope Harbour Farm

• Have fun hiking on the Falklands

• Meet Magellanic Penguin. These timid feather-shedders are named after the famed Portuguese explorer whose crew spotted them in 1520

• Discover Sea Lion Island. The southernmost human-populated island of the Falkland archipelago, Sea Lion Island forms an important habitat for many plant and bird species
Enquire now about Falkland Islands

Travel on the Plancius

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