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Along the Pacific Ring of Fire

Considered a traveller’s bucket-list must, the Pacific Ring of Fire will stretch your horizons to their limits. Stand in silent awe at the foot of an active volcano, yet experience a different kind of wonderment as you gaze, amazed, at the famous floating Torii gate, considered one of the “three views of Japan”. From UNESCO World Heritage Sites to tranquil gardens, experience 13-days of savage beauty and cultural history on this journey.
29 April, 2019 to 12 May, 2019 Make a booking request for Along the Pacific Ring of Fire, departing on 29 April, 2019

Prices quoted here are often dependent on currency fluctuations. Please check with (01432 507450 or info@small-cruise-ships.com) for the very latest price, which may well be cheaper than the one advertised here.

Adventurer Suite £ 5698 GBP pp
Even guests who plan to spend only sleeping hours in their stateroom will appreciate the distinctive touches of this cosy Silversea accommodation. Dimensions: 157-167 sq ft / 14-15m2 with 2 portholes. All Adventurer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two portholes (15.75'' / 40cm in diameter). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Explorer Suite £ 5929 GBP pp
Deck Four forward is home to eight Explorer Class staterooms. Enjoy a separate sitting area and the passing scenery through a view window. Dimensions: 175-190 sq ft / 16-18m2 with view window. All Explorer Class staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window (31.5'' x 31.5'' / 80cm x 80cm). Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
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View Suite £ 6545 GBP pp
The perfect backdrop for breakfast in bed. As spacious as a Veranda Suite, but with a view window and Deck Three location. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with view window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. View window, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Triple capacity that can accommodate young children on sofa bed, (View Suites 310, 311, 312, 313), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
view cabin photo
Vista Suite £ 6930 GBP pp
A quiet sanctuary. The sitting area has plenty of room to relax. Large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views. Some Vista Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 192 sq ft / 18m2 with large picture window. All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large picture window: 47'' x 43'' / 120cm / 110cm, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
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Veranda Suite £ 9394 GBP pp
A Silversea signature. Floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a private French balcony. Each spectacular sunset feels like it is yours alone. Dimensions: 206-216 sq ft / 19-20m2 including French balcony (16 sq ft / 1.5m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. French balcony with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, (Suites 512 and 513 have a fixed queen bed), Marbled bathroom with tub/shower combination, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone
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Medallion Suite £ 12705 GBP pp
A mark of distinction. Sumptuous. Spacious. Rich textures surround you with distinguished luxury. The private veranda surrounds you with panoramic views. Dimensions: 400 sq ft / 37m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Writing desk, Flat screen television with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table
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Silver Suite £ 13629 GBP pp
Stylish and sophisticated. Spacious and welcoming. With separate dining and living rooms, two French balconies, and preferred midship location, Silver Suites are a favourite of returning Silversea guests. Silver Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 422 sq ft / 39m2 including 2 French balconies (30 sq ft / 3m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Two French balconies with floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest), Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table
view cabin photo
Grand Suite £ 15015 GBP pp
Expertly designed and exquisitely appointed. At 618 square feet (57 square metres), the Grand Suite is ideal for entertaining friends or enjoying quiet time alone on your private veranda. Grand Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 618 sq ft / 57m2 including veranda (86 sq ft / 8m2). All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
view cabin photo
Owner's Suite £ 16632 GBP pp
The name says it all. A stylish apartment. Prestigious and classic. For those whose standards are higher than most. Owner's Suites can accommodate three guests. Dimensions: 728 sq ft / 67m2 including large veranda (158 sq ft / 15m2), All suites and staterooms feature: Butler service, champagne upon request, refrigerator and bar setup stocked with your beverage preferences, European bath amenities, fine bed linens and down duvets, premium mattresses, a choice of nine pillow types, spa robes and slippers, personalised stationery, umbrella, hair dryer, WiFi Internet access (fee applies) and daily suite service with nightly turndown. Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors, Living room with sitting area, Twin beds or queen-sized bed, Marbled bathroom with full-sized bath and separate shower, Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe, Vanity table with hair dryer, Writing desk, Two flat screen televisions with interactive video, on-demand movies and music, and satellite news programming, Direct-dial telephone, Laundry service, Dry cleaning and pressing, Afternoon canapés upon request, Dinner at officer's table, Four hours of Internet service per suite, per voyage segment, Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
view cabin photo

Along the Pacific Ring of Fire itinerary:

show reverse itinerary
Day 1 - Apra Guam
Guam is blessed with spectacular natural beauty and a rich cultural history. Apra Harbor is a deep-water port located on the western side of the island near the Mariana Islands and the Mariana Trench, which is the deepest part of the earth’s oceans, and the deepest location of the earth itself. The port serves both as a U.S. naval station and Guam’s main commercial port. The harbour, formed by the Orote Peninsula to the south and Cabras Island in the north, is considered to be one of the best natural ports in the Pacific. Guam’s unique culture, traditions and heritage have remained intact despite European imperialism, wars and changing foreign governments.
Day 2 - Saipan Northern Marianas
The Northern Mariana Islands are a chain of 15 tropical islands in the western Pacific Ocean, about 120 miles (193 km) north of Guam. At 12 miles in length and 5 miles wide (19 x 8 km), Saipan is the largest of the 15 islands, and site of the CNMI capital. Settlement of Saipan and its neighbouring islands occurred circa 2000 BC by the Chamorro people who arrived via similar routes as their cousins in Guam. Ferdinand Magellan first sighted the Mariana Islands in March 1521 and claimed “Las Islas de las Velas Latinas” for Spain. In 1668, the islands’ name changed to the present one in honour of Mariana of Austria, the widow of Spain’s king, Philip IV.
Day 3 - Pagan Northern Marianas
Among the 15 islands of the Northern Marianas, Pagan Island consists of two stratovolcanoes joined by a strip of land that is less than 600 meters (2,000 feet) across at its narrowest point. The island was completely evacuated in 1981 when a large eruption forced the small Micronesian community to relocate to Saipan. Pagan, the northern volcano, is still active, and one of the more recent lava-flows has come close to the small former settlement on the west coast. To reach this lava flow one has to follow an old runway used by the Japanese during the 1940s, where the remains of several bunkers, pill boxes and planes can still be seen. A hike up the ridge will reveal a scenic view of two lakes further north.
Day 4 - Maug Islands Northern Marianas
Three small elongated islands up to 2.3 km (1.4 miles) in length are all that remains of Maug volcano. The islands form the northern, western, and eastern rims of Maug’s largely submerged caldera. The highest point reaches 227 meters (745 feet) above sea level and the caldera has an average submarine depth of about 200 meters (656 feet). The natural harbor contains a twin-peaked central lava dome that rises up from the seafloor to within a few fathoms of the surface. This perfect natural harbour often shelters dolphins near the southern entrance. The truncated inner walls of the caldera on all three islands show expose lava flows and pyroclastic deposits that are cut by radial dikes.
Day 5 - Day at sea
Day 6 - Chichijima Japan
The remote Bonin Islands are known in Japan as the Ogasawara Islands. This archipelago has earned the nickname, “Galapagos of the Orient” and was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 2011 for the unique plant and animal species that have evolved here. Chichijima, the “father island,” is the largest in the Ogasawara family of islands and yet another fantastic avian destination with several endemic species. Minamijima, a small uplifted coral island just south of the town, has a much photographed natural stone arch reflected in the small turquoise blue lagoon. Chichijima itself has good opportunities for swimming, snorkeling and sunbathing on one of the island’s pristine beaches.
Day 7 - Tori-shima Japan
The name Torishima translates to “Bird Island” and is a fitting name for this stark, uninhabited volcanic island that Japan has declared a Bird Sanctuary, Natural Monument and National Wildlife Protection Area. Located in the Izu Islands chain about 600 kilometers (370 miles) due south of Tokyo, Torishima is home to about 1500 mature Short-tailed Albatrosses. This rare species is known to breed on only four islands in the North Pacific, with close to 80% nesting on the volcanic ash slopes of Torishima. As the island is an active volcano (last eruption in 2002) a landing here is only granted to scientists, and then only by helicopter. .
Day 8 - Day at sea
Day 9 - Miyanoura - Yakushima Japan
Yakushima is a round-shaped subtropical island off the southern coast of Kyushu island and part of Kagoshima prefecture. One fifth of this island is designated a Natural World Heritage Site in 1993, and it is covered by an extensive cedar forest that contains some of Japan’s oldest living trees. The symbol of Yakushima is called Yaku-Sugi, meaning Japanese cedar, which is only used for cedar trees over 1,000 years old. The oldest Yaku-Sugi is considered to be more than 7,000 years old.
Day 10 - Beppu Japan
Day 11 - Moji Japan
Moji used to be an important international trading port with a number of well-preserved Western buildings. Several of these historic buildings can be seen along the attractive waterfront. Southwest of Moji , and part of the same city, is Kokura, the financial and business capital of the area. Kokura’s landmark is its castle, which has been beautifully restored. The remarkable garden located next to the main castle is not too far from the Manga Museum. South of Moji is the Hiraodai Limestone Plateau, Japan’s most representative karst plateau. The pure white limestone scattered throughout the landscape is often mistaken for sheep grazing in the grass.
Day 12 - Hiroshima & Miyajima Japan
On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 am, a massive chunk of metal known as Little Boy fell from an American plane, and the sky ignited and glowed for an instant. In that brief moment, however, it became as hot as the surface of the sun in Hiroshima, until then a rather ordinary workaday city in wartime Japan. Half the city was leveled by the resulting blast, and the rest was set ablaze. Rain impregnated with radioactive fallout then fell, killing many that the fire and 1,000-mph shock wave had not. By the end of this mind-boggling disaster, more than 140,000 people died. The small island of Miyajima (“The Shrine Island”) is known for the Floating Torii Gate, which is one of “The Three Most Beautiful Views” of Japan. Built in the water, the Torii Gate leads to the Itsukushima Shrine and at high tide it seems to float. The Torii Gate is one of the most photographed sites in all of Japan. There are many more shrines and paths on Miyajima that are inviting to walk. Mount Misen has a cable car leading partly up to the top with nice views and wild monkeys and deer roaming the trails. .
Day 13 - Okayama Japan
Okayama is an important transportation hub and one of the largest cities of the Chugoku Region. It is famous because it has one of Japan’s most significant gardens. Although the “Korakuen” Garden was severely damaged by bombs in WWII, the descriptions and paintings from the Edo period permitted an exact reconstruction. It is one of the “Three Gardens of Japan” and has been designated a “Special Scenic Location”. Known formerly as the centre of rice-distribution in the Okayama area, many old warehouses next to the preserved canal have been converted into museums, boutiques and cafes. Another attraction is the Ohara Museum, which was the first Japanese Museum to permanently exhibit Western Art.
Day 14 - Kobe Japan
Located on the calm waters of the Inland Sea, Kobe has served as an important port town for hundreds of years. It was one of the first harbours to accept foreign traders in 1868 when Japan was just emerging from its centuries of isolation. What followed was a surge of Western trade and exports. Today, Kobe is quite multicultural, with expatriates from 98 different nations in residence, providing a cultural diversity most easily visible in restaurants serving every kind of cuisine, including the now world famous Kobe beef. The Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995 set back Kobe’s development, but not for long.
Please Note:
Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

Along the Pacific Ring of Fire reverse itinerary:

show main itinerary
Please Note: *
Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.
Day 14 - Kobe Japan *
Located on the calm waters of the Inland Sea, Kobe has served as an important port town for hundreds of years. It was one of the first harbours to accept foreign traders in 1868 when Japan was just emerging from its centuries of isolation. What followed was a surge of Western trade and exports. Today, Kobe is quite multicultural, with expatriates from 98 different nations in residence, providing a cultural diversity most easily visible in restaurants serving every kind of cuisine, including the now world famous Kobe beef. The Great Hanshin Earthquake of 1995 set back Kobe’s development, but not for long.
Day 13 - Okayama Japan *
Okayama is an important transportation hub and one of the largest cities of the Chugoku Region. It is famous because it has one of Japan’s most significant gardens. Although the “Korakuen” Garden was severely damaged by bombs in WWII, the descriptions and paintings from the Edo period permitted an exact reconstruction. It is one of the “Three Gardens of Japan” and has been designated a “Special Scenic Location”. Known formerly as the centre of rice-distribution in the Okayama area, many old warehouses next to the preserved canal have been converted into museums, boutiques and cafes. Another attraction is the Ohara Museum, which was the first Japanese Museum to permanently exhibit Western Art.
Day 12 - Hiroshima & Miyajima Japan *
On August 6, 1945, at 8:15 am, a massive chunk of metal known as Little Boy fell from an American plane, and the sky ignited and glowed for an instant. In that brief moment, however, it became as hot as the surface of the sun in Hiroshima, until then a rather ordinary workaday city in wartime Japan. Half the city was leveled by the resulting blast, and the rest was set ablaze. Rain impregnated with radioactive fallout then fell, killing many that the fire and 1,000-mph shock wave had not. By the end of this mind-boggling disaster, more than 140,000 people died. The small island of Miyajima (“The Shrine Island”) is known for the Floating Torii Gate, which is one of “The Three Most Beautiful Views” of Japan. Built in the water, the Torii Gate leads to the Itsukushima Shrine and at high tide it seems to float. The Torii Gate is one of the most photographed sites in all of Japan. There are many more shrines and paths on Miyajima that are inviting to walk. Mount Misen has a cable car leading partly up to the top with nice views and wild monkeys and deer roaming the trails. .
Day 11 - Moji Japan *
Moji used to be an important international trading port with a number of well-preserved Western buildings. Several of these historic buildings can be seen along the attractive waterfront. Southwest of Moji , and part of the same city, is Kokura, the financial and business capital of the area. Kokura’s landmark is its castle, which has been beautifully restored. The remarkable garden located next to the main castle is not too far from the Manga Museum. South of Moji is the Hiraodai Limestone Plateau, Japan’s most representative karst plateau. The pure white limestone scattered throughout the landscape is often mistaken for sheep grazing in the grass.
Day 10 - Beppu Japan *
Day 9 - Miyanoura - Yakushima Japan *
Yakushima is a round-shaped subtropical island off the southern coast of Kyushu island and part of Kagoshima prefecture. One fifth of this island is designated a Natural World Heritage Site in 1993, and it is covered by an extensive cedar forest that contains some of Japan’s oldest living trees. The symbol of Yakushima is called Yaku-Sugi, meaning Japanese cedar, which is only used for cedar trees over 1,000 years old. The oldest Yaku-Sugi is considered to be more than 7,000 years old.
Day 8 - Day at sea *
Day 7 - Tori-shima Japan *
The name Torishima translates to “Bird Island” and is a fitting name for this stark, uninhabited volcanic island that Japan has declared a Bird Sanctuary, Natural Monument and National Wildlife Protection Area. Located in the Izu Islands chain about 600 kilometers (370 miles) due south of Tokyo, Torishima is home to about 1500 mature Short-tailed Albatrosses. This rare species is known to breed on only four islands in the North Pacific, with close to 80% nesting on the volcanic ash slopes of Torishima. As the island is an active volcano (last eruption in 2002) a landing here is only granted to scientists, and then only by helicopter. .
Day 6 - Chichijima Japan *
The remote Bonin Islands are known in Japan as the Ogasawara Islands. This archipelago has earned the nickname, “Galapagos of the Orient” and was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 2011 for the unique plant and animal species that have evolved here. Chichijima, the “father island,” is the largest in the Ogasawara family of islands and yet another fantastic avian destination with several endemic species. Minamijima, a small uplifted coral island just south of the town, has a much photographed natural stone arch reflected in the small turquoise blue lagoon. Chichijima itself has good opportunities for swimming, snorkeling and sunbathing on one of the island’s pristine beaches.
Day 5 - Day at sea *
Day 4 - Maug Islands Northern Marianas *
Three small elongated islands up to 2.3 km (1.4 miles) in length are all that remains of Maug volcano. The islands form the northern, western, and eastern rims of Maug’s largely submerged caldera. The highest point reaches 227 meters (745 feet) above sea level and the caldera has an average submarine depth of about 200 meters (656 feet). The natural harbor contains a twin-peaked central lava dome that rises up from the seafloor to within a few fathoms of the surface. This perfect natural harbour often shelters dolphins near the southern entrance. The truncated inner walls of the caldera on all three islands show expose lava flows and pyroclastic deposits that are cut by radial dikes.
Day 3 - Pagan Northern Marianas *
Among the 15 islands of the Northern Marianas, Pagan Island consists of two stratovolcanoes joined by a strip of land that is less than 600 meters (2,000 feet) across at its narrowest point. The island was completely evacuated in 1981 when a large eruption forced the small Micronesian community to relocate to Saipan. Pagan, the northern volcano, is still active, and one of the more recent lava-flows has come close to the small former settlement on the west coast. To reach this lava flow one has to follow an old runway used by the Japanese during the 1940s, where the remains of several bunkers, pill boxes and planes can still be seen. A hike up the ridge will reveal a scenic view of two lakes further north.
Day 2 - Saipan Northern Marianas *
The Northern Mariana Islands are a chain of 15 tropical islands in the western Pacific Ocean, about 120 miles (193 km) north of Guam. At 12 miles in length and 5 miles wide (19 x 8 km), Saipan is the largest of the 15 islands, and site of the CNMI capital. Settlement of Saipan and its neighbouring islands occurred circa 2000 BC by the Chamorro people who arrived via similar routes as their cousins in Guam. Ferdinand Magellan first sighted the Mariana Islands in March 1521 and claimed “Las Islas de las Velas Latinas” for Spain. In 1668, the islands’ name changed to the present one in honour of Mariana of Austria, the widow of Spain’s king, Philip IV.
Day 1 - Apra Guam *
Guam is blessed with spectacular natural beauty and a rich cultural history. Apra Harbor is a deep-water port located on the western side of the island near the Mariana Islands and the Mariana Trench, which is the deepest part of the earth’s oceans, and the deepest location of the earth itself. The port serves both as a U.S. naval station and Guam’s main commercial port. The harbour, formed by the Orote Peninsula to the south and Cabras Island in the north, is considered to be one of the best natural ports in the Pacific. Guam’s unique culture, traditions and heritage have remained intact despite European imperialism, wars and changing foreign governments.
* = Indicative
Map for Along the Pacific Ring of Fire
Silver Explorer, the ship servicing Along the Pacific Ring of Fire

Silver Explorer

Vessel Type: Luxury Expedition

Length: 108 metres

Passenger Capacity: 132

Built / refurbished: 1989 / 2008

The purpose-built Silver Explorer expedition ship (formerly the Prince Albert II) has been designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations, including both of earth’s polar regions. A strengthened hull with a Lloyd’s Register ice-class notation (1A) for passenger vessels enables Silver Explorer to safely push through ice floes with ease.

A fleet of Zodiac boats allows guests to visit even the most off-the-beaten path locations and an expert Expedition Team provides insight and understanding to each unforgettable Silver Explorer cruise adventure.

http://fromthedeckchair.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/silvex_restaurant.jpg

Cabin layout for Silver Explorer
• Discover Ogasawara - the “Galapagos of the Orient”

• Visit Torishima, “Bird Island” that Japan has declared a Bird Sanctuary, Natural Monument and National Wildlife Protection Area

• Visit infamous Hiroshima

• See the Floating Torii Gate, which is one of “The Three Most Beautiful Views” of Japan
Enquire now about Along the Pacific Ring of Fire

Travel on the Silver Explorer

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